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Apple hoping to reduce distracted driving with iOS 11

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Apple hoping to reduce distracted driving with iOS 11

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There is no doubt that distracted driving is a big issue in both Canada and the United States. The Canadian Coalition on Distracted Driving came up with the National Action Plan earlier this year and automakers are doing what they can to help. Now one phone maker is doing the same thing. 

 
Apple announced a new feature to their mobile operating system at the Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, California last week. Called Do Not Disturb, the feature will detect when you are driving and act accordingly to avoid distraction. It will black out the phone screen, not connect calls and will instead reply with an SMS telling the caller you’re driving. 
 
If you are a passenger in the car and not driving you can override the system so you can take calls as usual. Presumably you will be able to override the system if you are driving too but it is a step in the right direction.
 
As an added bonus, Apple also said they would be updating Apple Maps with lane guidance so you can plan well ahead what lane you need to be in. New maps will also feature speed limits in the area you are travelling. While neither will reduce distracted driving, they will all help us get places safely.
 
Distracted driving
According to the CAA, there are a lot of surprising statistics around distracted driving, such as:
 
Drivers are 23 times more likely to have a crash when texting.
Even checking a phone for calls or messages means you have driven the length of a football field without being aware of what is going on.
Around 26 percent of all vehicle collisions currently involve some form of mobile phone use.
Drivers who monitor their phone are apparently only half as aware of what is going on around them as they should be.
According to the U.S. NHTSA, 80 percent of collisions have inattention as a contributing factor. That equates to over 4 million collisions in the U.S. alone.
Driver distraction was also a factor in 60 percent of collisions involving teen drivers.
 
After reading those statistics, checking your phone while driving the car seems a whole lot more serious doesn’t it? 
 
Apple’s iOS 11 should be released as part of their normal update schedule which is September.

Categories: News